Can you turn off Window Time Service?
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Thread: Can you turn off Window Time Service?

  1. #1
    Sam Abraham Guest

    Can you turn off Window Time Service?

    Folks,

    I am running a SQL 7.0 database locally on a W2K PC.
    The database can be accessed over ISDN lines by a couple of remote users.
    Is there a problem if I turn off the Windows Time service?
    Our network runs NT servers,and a mixture of NT, W2K & W95 workstations but this PC is used on a standalone mode and only accessed on a WAN when the PC is not logged on.

    Sam

  2. #2
    Sean Stecker Guest

    Can you turn off Window Time Service? (reply)

    Sam,

    If the pc you refer to is truly standalone (not a member of a domain), then I suppose you could probably get away with it. If your pc is part of a domain authenticating to a Windows 2000 server, then I would suggest against it. The Windows Time Service is used during the authentication process when generating tickets, therefore it is pretty important when used with Windows 2000 clients and servers utilizing Kerberos.

    Is there a specific reason why you want to turn it off?

    Sean
    www.swynk.com/friends/stecker


    ------------
    Sam Abraham at 12/20/00 3:49:02 PM

    Folks,

    I am running a SQL 7.0 database locally on a W2K PC.
    The database can be accessed over ISDN lines by a couple of remote users.
    Is there a problem if I turn off the Windows Time service?
    Our network runs NT servers,and a mixture of NT, W2K & W95 workstations but this PC is used on a standalone mode and only accessed on a WAN when the PC is not logged on.

    Sam

  3. #3
    Sam Abraham Guest

    Can you turn off Window Time Service? (reply)

    Sean,

    We kept getting the following message in the Event Viewer:
    "Because of repeated network problems, the time service has not been able to find a domain controller to synchronize with for a long time. To reduce network traffic, the time service will wait 960 minutes before trying again. No synchronization will take place during this interval, even if network connectivity is restored. Accumulated time errors may cause certain network operations to fail. To tell the time service that network connectivity has been restored and that it should resynchronize, execute "w32tm /s" from the command line"
    It eventually corrupted the time on the PC and this in turn put the wrong time stamp on the SQL data. This required tha application programmer to have to correct the critical date fields.
    It is a standalone PC but the SQL data does get accessed through the WAN which may sound like a contradiction. To access the PC over the WAN it needs to be not a stand alone PC.
    We are a trusted NT domain under a W2K domain but from reading a little bit on the Windows Time Service, I do not know how to enable it to sync the time. When it is used for SQL data update, the user logs on locally (to the W2K PC) and does his thing. Then he logs off but does not shut it down to enable accessing the database.
    Thanks.
    Sam


    ------------
    Sean Stecker at 12/20/00 7:50:32 PM

    Sam,

    If the pc you refer to is truly standalone (not a member of a domain), then I suppose you could probably get away with it. If your pc is part of a domain authenticating to a Windows 2000 server, then I would suggest against it. The Windows Time Service is used during the authentication process when generating tickets, therefore it is pretty important when used with Windows 2000 clients and servers utilizing Kerberos.

    Is there a specific reason why you want to turn it off?

    Sean
    www.swynk.com/friends/stecker


    ------------
    Sam Abraham at 12/20/00 3:49:02 PM

    Folks,

    I am running a SQL 7.0 database locally on a W2K PC.
    The database can be accessed over ISDN lines by a couple of remote users.
    Is there a problem if I turn off the Windows Time service?
    Our network runs NT servers,and a mixture of NT, W2K & W95 workstations but this PC is used on a standalone mode and only accessed on a WAN when the PC is not logged on.

    Sam

  4. #4
    Sean Stecker Guest

    Can you turn off Window Time Service? (reply)

    Sam,

    You are getting this message because your pc can't find anyone to sync it's time with. If you are using only local accounts, I theoretically don't see an issue with disabling the time service.

    Maybe someone else out there knows of some reasons why you shouldn't.

    Sean
    www.sywnk.com/friends/stecker


    ------------
    Sam Abraham at 12/21/00 7:42:30 AM

    Sean,

    We kept getting the following message in the Event Viewer:
    "Because of repeated network problems, the time service has not been able to find a domain controller to synchronize with for a long time. To reduce network traffic, the time service will wait 960 minutes before trying again. No synchronization will take place during this interval, even if network connectivity is restored. Accumulated time errors may cause certain network operations to fail. To tell the time service that network connectivity has been restored and that it should resynchronize, execute "w32tm /s" from the command line"
    It eventually corrupted the time on the PC and this in turn put the wrong time stamp on the SQL data. This required tha application programmer to have to correct the critical date fields.
    It is a standalone PC but the SQL data does get accessed through the WAN which may sound like a contradiction. To access the PC over the WAN it needs to be not a stand alone PC.
    We are a trusted NT domain under a W2K domain but from reading a little bit on the Windows Time Service, I do not know how to enable it to sync the time. When it is used for SQL data update, the user logs on locally (to the W2K PC) and does his thing. Then he logs off but does not shut it down to enable accessing the database.
    Thanks.
    Sam


    ------------
    Sean Stecker at 12/20/00 7:50:32 PM

    Sam,

    If the pc you refer to is truly standalone (not a member of a domain), then I suppose you could probably get away with it. If your pc is part of a domain authenticating to a Windows 2000 server, then I would suggest against it. The Windows Time Service is used during the authentication process when generating tickets, therefore it is pretty important when used with Windows 2000 clients and servers utilizing Kerberos.

    Is there a specific reason why you want to turn it off?

    Sean
    www.swynk.com/friends/stecker


    ------------
    Sam Abraham at 12/20/00 3:49:02 PM

    Folks,

    I am running a SQL 7.0 database locally on a W2K PC.
    The database can be accessed over ISDN lines by a couple of remote users.
    Is there a problem if I turn off the Windows Time service?
    Our network runs NT servers,and a mixture of NT, W2K & W95 workstations but this PC is used on a standalone mode and only accessed on a WAN when the PC is not logged on.

    Sam

  5. #5
    John Dittrich Guest

    Can you turn off Window Time Service? (reply)

    Sam, we had the same error messages on our w2k workstations in our NT domain. This Technet article: Q258059 has a method of setting up an NT 4 server as a time server for w2k workstations. This doesn't disable the service, it makes it work with NT 4 time sync instead.

    Hope this helps,
    John


    ------------
    Sean Stecker at 12/21/00 7:24:33 PM

    Sam,

    You are getting this message because your pc can't find anyone to sync it's time with. If you are using only local accounts, I theoretically don't see an issue with disabling the time service.

    Maybe someone else out there knows of some reasons why you shouldn't.

    Sean
    www.sywnk.com/friends/stecker


    ------------
    Sam Abraham at 12/21/00 7:42:30 AM

    Sean,

    We kept getting the following message in the Event Viewer:
    "Because of repeated network problems, the time service has not been able to find a domain controller to synchronize with for a long time. To reduce network traffic, the time service will wait 960 minutes before trying again. No synchronization will take place during this interval, even if network connectivity is restored. Accumulated time errors may cause certain network operations to fail. To tell the time service that network connectivity has been restored and that it should resynchronize, execute "w32tm /s" from the command line"
    It eventually corrupted the time on the PC and this in turn put the wrong time stamp on the SQL data. This required tha application programmer to have to correct the critical date fields.
    It is a standalone PC but the SQL data does get accessed through the WAN which may sound like a contradiction. To access the PC over the WAN it needs to be not a stand alone PC.
    We are a trusted NT domain under a W2K domain but from reading a little bit on the Windows Time Service, I do not know how to enable it to sync the time. When it is used for SQL data update, the user logs on locally (to the W2K PC) and does his thing. Then he logs off but does not shut it down to enable accessing the database.
    Thanks.
    Sam


    ------------
    Sean Stecker at 12/20/00 7:50:32 PM

    Sam,

    If the pc you refer to is truly standalone (not a member of a domain), then I suppose you could probably get away with it. If your pc is part of a domain authenticating to a Windows 2000 server, then I would suggest against it. The Windows Time Service is used during the authentication process when generating tickets, therefore it is pretty important when used with Windows 2000 clients and servers utilizing Kerberos.

    Is there a specific reason why you want to turn it off?

    Sean
    www.swynk.com/friends/stecker


    ------------
    Sam Abraham at 12/20/00 3:49:02 PM

    Folks,

    I am running a SQL 7.0 database locally on a W2K PC.
    The database can be accessed over ISDN lines by a couple of remote users.
    Is there a problem if I turn off the Windows Time service?
    Our network runs NT servers,and a mixture of NT, W2K & W95 workstations but this PC is used on a standalone mode and only accessed on a WAN when the PC is not logged on.

    Sam

  6. #6
    GD Guest

    Can you turn off Window Time Service? (reply)

    Ok so what if you have a w2k server in a NT domain. That isn't using w32time or timeserve?
    Well I disabled the time service on the W2K box, and set a scheduled job using the 'net time' command. As all our other servers and workstations run this at logon - everything seem,s ok.

    GD


    ------------
    John Dittrich at 1/18/01 4:24:55 PM

    Sam, we had the same error messages on our w2k workstations in our NT domain. This Technet article: Q258059 has a method of setting up an NT 4 server as a time server for w2k workstations. This doesn't disable the service, it makes it work with NT 4 time sync instead.

    Hope this helps,
    John


    ------------
    Sean Stecker at 12/21/00 7:24:33 PM

    Sam,

    You are getting this message because your pc can't find anyone to sync it's time with. If you are using only local accounts, I theoretically don't see an issue with disabling the time service.

    Maybe someone else out there knows of some reasons why you shouldn't.

    Sean
    www.sywnk.com/friends/stecker


    ------------
    Sam Abraham at 12/21/00 7:42:30 AM

    Sean,

    We kept getting the following message in the Event Viewer:
    "Because of repeated network problems, the time service has not been able to find a domain controller to synchronize with for a long time. To reduce network traffic, the time service will wait 960 minutes before trying again. No synchronization will take place during this interval, even if network connectivity is restored. Accumulated time errors may cause certain network operations to fail. To tell the time service that network connectivity has been restored and that it should resynchronize, execute "w32tm /s" from the command line"
    It eventually corrupted the time on the PC and this in turn put the wrong time stamp on the SQL data. This required tha application programmer to have to correct the critical date fields.
    It is a standalone PC but the SQL data does get accessed through the WAN which may sound like a contradiction. To access the PC over the WAN it needs to be not a stand alone PC.
    We are a trusted NT domain under a W2K domain but from reading a little bit on the Windows Time Service, I do not know how to enable it to sync the time. When it is used for SQL data update, the user logs on locally (to the W2K PC) and does his thing. Then he logs off but does not shut it down to enable accessing the database.
    Thanks.
    Sam


    ------------
    Sean Stecker at 12/20/00 7:50:32 PM

    Sam,

    If the pc you refer to is truly standalone (not a member of a domain), then I suppose you could probably get away with it. If your pc is part of a domain authenticating to a Windows 2000 server, then I would suggest against it. The Windows Time Service is used during the authentication process when generating tickets, therefore it is pretty important when used with Windows 2000 clients and servers utilizing Kerberos.

    Is there a specific reason why you want to turn it off?

    Sean
    www.swynk.com/friends/stecker


    ------------
    Sam Abraham at 12/20/00 3:49:02 PM

    Folks,

    I am running a SQL 7.0 database locally on a W2K PC.
    The database can be accessed over ISDN lines by a couple of remote users.
    Is there a problem if I turn off the Windows Time service?
    Our network runs NT servers,and a mixture of NT, W2K & W95 workstations but this PC is used on a standalone mode and only accessed on a WAN when the PC is not logged on.

    Sam

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